Can you donate blood after major surgery?

How long should you wait to donate blood after surgery?

Autologous (Self-donation): eligible three months after surgery. Blood donation: Whole blood: 56 days (8 weeks) since last donation. Automated, double red cells: 112 days. Blood transfusion: three months after receiving blood or blood products.

Who Cannot donate blood?

You will be denied if your blood tests positive for: HIV-1, HIV-2, human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV)-I, HTLV-II, hepatitis C virus, hepatitis B virus, West Nile Virus (WNV), and T. pallidum (syphilis). Blood donation is actually a quick and easy way to get tested for all of these things.

What are the requirements for donating blood?

To donate blood or platelets, you must be in good general health, weigh at least 110 pounds, and be at least 16 years old. Parental consent is required for blood donation by 16 year olds; 16 year olds are NOT eligible to donate platelets. No parental consent is required for those who are at least 17 years old.

What happens if you donate blood with high blood pressure?

Acceptable as long as your blood pressure is below 180 systolic (first number) and below 100 diastolic (second number) at the time of donation. Medications for high blood pressure do not disqualify you from donating.

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Do I need to know my blood type to donate blood?

You don’t need to know your blood type.

Donors may be notified of their blood type following their donation when they receive their blood donor card or by creating a profile through the Red Cross Blood Donor App.

What happens if you donate blood under 110 pounds?

Weight: You must weigh at least 110 pounds to be eligible for blood donation for your own safety. Blood volume is in proportion to body weight. Donors who weigh less than 110 pounds may not tolerate the removal of the required volume of blood as well as those who weigh more than 110 pounds.

Do you get paid for donating blood?

In practice, nobody really pays for blood, said Mario Macis, an economist at the Johns Hopkins Carey Business School who has studied incentives for blood donation. “Even though it’s legal, it’s still considered not totally moral or ethical to pay cash to blood donors.”